Friday, April 27, 2012

Sweden's Royal Armoury Museum Launches Smartphone App from aMuze! Interactive

Stockholm, Sweden -- The Royal Armoury, Livrustkammaren, Sweden's oldest museum - illustrating the history of Sweden's monarchs for nearly 400 years - has extended the depth and breadth of what their visitors can explore, with the launch of "LivRustApp," a customized App built on the aMuze! Interactive KnowledgeApp System.

Visitors can download the LivRustApp from either the Apple App Store or Google Play. As they move through the museum, they use the App's built-in QR-code reader to scan QR-coded labels and signage, and connect with deeper content and broader context about selected objects and themes in the collections and temporary exhibitions.

Upon scanning a code, visitors can dive into extended texts, listen to audio guides, watch a video, play an interactive game, or be challenged by provocative questions that connect objects from the past with issues of today.


Visitors can save their favorites to their personal collections, and share their favorites with their friends.

Museum staff can easily create and edit content on the App through the aMuze! Interactive web-based administration system, which also delivers comprehensive statistics on visitor interests and behavior.

The application had its premier in combination with the opening of a year-long exhibit about the Finnish/Swedish courtier and statesman, Gustav Mauritz Armfelt (1757-1814).

Armfelt was a remarkable figure in a remarkable time. On the move for much of his life, he was active in the courts of Stockholm, St Petersburg, and Naples. He was war-hero, royal favorite, fugitive, theater-director, traitor and patriot (depending upon your point of view), a man of many loves - both physical and cerebral, the father of a good many children, and one of the fathers of an independent Finland, through his interventions at the court of Tzar Alexander.

One of the goals of the Royal Armoury is to attract more male visitors in the age group 18-35 – a demographic group that is conspicuously absent from many museums. Using the chameleonic career of Armfelt as a base, aMuze has developed a short interactive game within the app, “The Armfelt Adventure”, which aims to attract and engage this game-loving target group in the quandaries and dilemmas that Armfelt faced. The game incorporates elements of the physical exhibit, as well as the smartphone.

For more information about the exhibit and the application, and to receive test copies of a selection of QR-codes, visit www.amuze-interactive.com